Dark Sky Meter App

First of all: a big/huge thank you for using my app.

As of september 2017 i decided to withdraw the app from the store. Reasons:
 
- Money. The montly app store income was about $25. The hosting costs were almost double. 
 
- Time: it is a hobby project and i do not have time anymore to maintain it 
(2 lovely little kids get priority).
 
- Quality of the app. We did about 5000 measurements for iPhone 4S, 5 and 5S, but not enough to get good 
formulas for newer models. 
Resulting in (big) differences between iPhone 7 and unihedron SQM's.
 
- Bad reviews. The app got poor reviews, even one with 'worst app ever'. 
That doesn't motivate me to keep the app updated.
 
With iOS 11 and more new models to come i decided to stop the development. In 2018, i will put the source code (ObjectiveC) on github so someone is free to grab the code and get it online again.
 
Best
Norbert

The app (iPhone only) uses the camera to collect light at night. The aim is to provide a cheap alternative to expensive light meters. When you submit your measurements the data is used for scientific research. The app got awarded by the IDA and has been featured on BBC, CBS and Scientific American.
The app is developed by Norbert Schmidt and Harro Treur, and supported by many scientists and the International Dark Sky Association.

App FAQ

Answer

This setting is for people who own a unihedron SQM or SQM-L. If you own a unihedron SQM the calibration on the iPhone can be adjusted to the outcome of the Unihedron Sky Quality Meter. The SQM uses dedicated hardware and is known as the gold standard. You can roughly calibrate the app using the unihedron sqm. iPhones can differ slightly (but constantly). It is best to take a series of measurements using both devices. Example If the SQM shows 20.30 and your iPhone shows 20.15 you can put .15 in the 20.00 and up field. or If the SQM shows 20.15 and your iPhone shows 20.13 you can put -.15 in the 20.00 and up field. Same goes for measurements with sqm 20 or lower, then you should use the 10.0>20.0

Answer

No. There are a lot of different Android devices, more than 4000 in total (2013). With so many camera types on the market, it will be impossible to make a decent Android port of our software. Adapting our software to all cameras will be impossible or cost a fortune.

Answer

Dark Sky Meter is an idea of Norbert Schmidt (software developer) and Harro Treur (engineer). We are amateur astronomers and were looking for a cheap alternative to expensive light meters.

Answer

It is not intended for iPad. Earlier models have a poor camera. And the software cannot discriminate devices (Apple policy).

Answer

The iPhone has a consumer camera and is not designed to collect a lot of light at night. Later models have very sensitive chips, but they aren't as good as the professional, dedicated light measuring devices. On a really dark site, take a minimum of 2-3 measurements and average them.

Answer

You pay 1$ to cover my hosting costs and the many, many hours of private time we spent on it (beer money). You save about $110 for a SQM device.